Sunday, January 07, 2007

 

Lord's Day in Trujillo

This morning we worshipped with the church at Wichanzao, which is where we'll be doing most of our work on the medical clinic. Pastor Guillermo Diaz (pictured below) taught Sunday School before the worship service and then led us in worship. I had been invited to preach this morning at Wichanzao, and was very honored to bring God's Word to the people there this morning. There should be more pictures of Wichanzao over the next several days as we begin work on the medical clinic there.



After worship this morning we all went back to the Bradfords house for lunch. When I say all of us, I mean our team of 12, 4 Peru Mission interns, Bill & Allen Bradford, Wes & Jami Baker, Allen & Sandi Smith, John & Heather Ferguson, and each family's children (18) -- that would be a total of 38 people for lunch! All of the missionaries here are very gifted and well practiced in offering hospitality and it was greatly appreciated by our team. After lunch all 38 of us gathered in the living room to sing some hymns and pray before our team headed back to the hotel for a short nap before the evening service.

For the evening service we worshipped at the Larco Church which is where we worked and spent most of our time last year. It was great to see the work we had done last year not only completed, but to see that quite a bit more work had been done on the church as well. What was even better, however, was seeing familiar faces. We were eager to see friends that we made last year in that congregation and were warmly received by them. Larco Church is pastored by Ricardo Hernandez (pictured below talking with Jeff Hebenstreit) who recently graduated with his Bachelor of Divinity degree from Seminario Biblico Reformado (SBR) and was ordained. Ricardo is the first ever graduate of SBR.



Larco Church also honored me with an invitation to preach and so I did this evening. That makes four times now that I've preached through a translator. Preaching through a translator can be a little difficult, though my translator, Bill Bradford (see us below at Larco Church), is very good. It's simply not always easy to get into a good rhythm when you have to pause after every sentence for the translation. It's harder to complete long thoughts and can be a little challenging when trying to phrase things a certain way or use one's voice emphatically. I also had to rewrite my sermons a little to try and excise many of the idioms that I often use in a sermon back in the states. I'm sure that preaching through a translator gets a little easier when done more frequently. All in all I thought things went well, and I was humlbed and honored to have been asked to preach to Christ's church here in Peru.



After the evening service the team went back to Allen & Sandi Smith's home for dinner. Again we were treated to some first class hospitality--by the Smiths this time. We relaxed and enjoyed ourselves at their home and then returned to the hotel at about 10-10:30 p.m.

The group is doing well. Everyone is healthy, sleeping well, getting along fine. The work starts tomorrow on the medical clinic and I found out that my seminary classes will be taught at the Larco Church rather than at the SBR facility. The classes will be open to more than just seminary students, members of the congregations will be welcome as well. The classes will be offered at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings. Pray for me as I teach two sessions on the Doctrine of Vocation and one session on the Life of Charles Simeon.

Comments:
I guess you can't really say much about Purdue University can you? ;)
 
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